Blog

Why I Blog at Work – I Want to Change Intel

(Reposted from my internal work blog)

Had a few interesting conversations over the last week or so about why I blog at Intel, and I’ve done some thinking on the topic. I wanted to share some of my rationale, however deluded or grandiose it may seem…

I want to change Intel. I want to make a real, tangible difference in what kind of company Intel is. And I mean that literally, not in the touchy-feely change the world sense. I want people to look at what I’m doing and say “Josh Bancroft made Intel a more open, transparent company, inside and out.”

/insert comment about Josh’s ego here. :-)

I really don’t look at it as an ego issue, though. The way I see it, even if I do an excellent job of supporting my customers and their environment, I haven’t contributed anything that someone else with the same skillset could have done. What I want to do is take something I’m passionate and experienced in (opening communication through blogs and other media) and apply it to make Intel a better company. Break through the bureaucracy and heirarchy. Poke some holes in the corporate membrane. Turn the course of this supertanker a degree or two.

Intel will make better products as a result of better conversation with its customers. Intel will have better, more productive employees and teams as a result of conversation among ourselves. Want proof? Look at Microsoft, and how their products have improved as a result of their forward thinking attitude about blogging and conversation with customers.

Intel has a culture of fear and paranoia. That kills conversation. The only cure for it is education – showing people the benefits of open, honest, human communication. Teach them it’s not the end of the world to talk about something on their blog. I’ve got some interesting ideas bobbing about in my head about some fun things I want to do along these lines. And I’d love to hear what you guys think.

How can we tear down the obstacles? Who’s with me on changing Intel into a Cluetrain company?

Standard